61 Havit hv-KB390L

Havit HV-KB390L Mechanical Keyboard Review

  1. About the Havit HV-390L Low Profile keyboard...
  2. Keyboard Design and Overview
  3. Conclusion
  4. Online Purchase Links

Disclosure: The HV-KB390L mechanical keyboard is provided by Havit

About the Havit HV-KB390L…

The Havit HV-KB390L mechanical keyboard is really special due to its slim design thanks to Kailh’s low profile mechanical switches. You would assume such switches are made for notebook manufacturers and maybe chiclet-style keyboard makers. The travel distance on this keyboard is 3mm. Though it does provide the clickity blue switch type sound upon actuation, the required force is only 45 grams. While Havit doesn’t overcrowd its name with the word ‘gaming’, it is kept under the gaming category. It also provides macros, game mode, WIN LOCK mode and list goes on!

Packaging and Contents

The packaging is decent enough. Though I wish the packaging had some type of protection for the keys, the packaging as bubble-wrapped and had a Havit tape on it. I am assuming this is how it is shipped. If not, hopefully, online retailers will do their part. The Havit 390L has a single backlit colour but with multiple modes and brightness level. Havit assures all the keys have an anti-ghosting function.

This keyboard is interesting. While most mechanical keyboard manufacturers aim towards gamers, this seems to be aiming for general users. Still, it has some useful features such as detachable USB cable and lightweight design.

Features and Specification

  • Size: 354*127.5*22.5mm
  • Layout: US Layout
  • Operating force: 45±10gf
  • Key number: 87 keys
  • Travel(Total): 3.0mm
  • Interface Type: USB
  • Anti-ghosting: N-Key Rollover
  • Net weight: 520g
  • Voltage: 4.75V±10%
  • Current: ≤ 50mA (No backlight),≤ 250 mA (brightest backlight)
  • Cable length: 1500mm (Black USB cable)
  • Service Life: >50 Million Key Operation
  • Compatible with: Win10/8/7/Vista/Mac/Linux/IBM PC (Driver software available in Windows only)

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